Marion Zimmer Bradley's Ancestors of Avalon

Marion Zimmer Bradley's Ancestors of Avalon

Book - 2004
Average Rating:
3
Rate this:
Once again, Diana L. Paxson has beautifully elaborated on Marion Zimmer Bradley’s beloved Avalon saga with this dramatic new installment, which for the first time reveals the past of the ancestors of Avalon, from their beginnings on the doomed island of Atlantis to their escape to the mist-shrouded isle of Britain. It follows the extraordinary journey of two powerful women whose destinies will shape the fates of their physical and spiritual descendants: Tiriki, a high priestess exiled by the fall of Atlantis, torn between the claims of love and duty, and Damisa, a young acolyte of royal blood, tempted by ambition to forsake her spiritual path.Hints of this mysterious past have haunted all the novels of Avalon, but until now the full sweep of this rich history has not been revealed. Dramatic, peopled with the remarkable women who have always inhabited Avalon, and set in a world of enchantment that will sweep readers to a richly imagined time and place, Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Ancestors of Avalon is another spectacular epic that is sure to please Bradley’s many ardent readers.
Publisher: New York : Viking, 2004.
ISBN: 9780670033140
0670033146
Characteristics: xvi, 363 p. :,ill., map ;,24 cm.
Additional Contributors: Bradley, Marion Zimmer
Alternative Title: Ancestors of Avalon

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

d
denisekelleher
Feb 20, 2016

Easy to read with plenty of crises

FindingJane Aug 25, 2014

Ms. Paxson’s sweeping epic of the fall of Atlantis, the struggle for survival of its few remaining refugees and the rise and fall of Stonehenge is brimming with passion, adventure and the absorbing rituals of mundane living along with the tensions and conflicts that arise when old cultures meet new societies.

While men and women hold more or less equal place, we are witness once again to the power of the feminine spirit, especially when pitted against male energies. There is no facile, smug superiority about the females triumphing over males; the messages in this book are not so cut and dried as that. But arrogance, pride and hubris and the dangers that attend them do seem to be loaded heavily on the masculine side.

Psychic energies are in full sway here, along with the awe and terror that they inspire. Gods and goddesses have their say, in various ways, enriching the book’s limning of a history that’s bound to be a little sketchy. If the muttering of prophecies seems a little too heavy and the story lacking in humor, it’s to be expected; portents and omens can be head-scratching mysteries, even to the people who speak them. Such mysteries make the book profound but not too dense. It’s a fascinating imagination of an ancient people and Ms. Paxson is a worthy successor to the departed Ms. Bradley.

Cdnbookworm Nov 09, 2013

This novel was inspired by Marion Zimmer Bradley's series on Avalon, of which I read Mists of Avalon years ago and loved. I put this book on my list several years ago, and finally got around to reading it. It is a kind of prequel taking place many years before the Avalon books.
I read another book in this series by Paxson, Ravens of Avalon some time ago as well and enjoyed it. This novel begins with the fall of Atlantis and the destruction of several islands that made up the empire. The main characters are Tiriki and Micail, wife and husband, priestess and priest, princess and prince. As they arrange to leave their dying empire, events separate them and while they both survive, they are not together. There are several other strong characters here. Damisa is an acolyte that ends up with Tiriki. She is also a princess and her expectations of what her life will bring undergoes several changes as the book progresses. There are several other acolytes, priests and priestesses, sailors and princes that also survived, and the struggle to survive and move forward is what drives this story. Different groups have different expectations, some wanting to recreate what was lost, and others wanting to make a new way in the new country they have come to, learning how to live with the native peoples.
It was an interesting take on the Atlantis legend.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at Library

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top